Print Page   |   Contact Us
ISAE Blog
Blog Home All Blogs
In an effort to continue to be the vehicle for sharing best practices, creating a dialogue and advancing our profession, ISAE will continue to welcome valuable content pertinent to the association profession. We are in need of quality content to share with hundreds of industry professionals.

 

Search all posts for:   

 

Top tags: meeting planners  meetings  association  events  marketing  Leadership  isae  meeting tips  social media  .orgSource  Education  google  succession planning  technology  afforadable  Alignment  ASAE  best practices  black friday  browser  CAE  communicate  community  consistent  content  convention  conventions  Core Values  culture  definition 

Dana's Meeting Minutes: Three Tips and One Awesome Idea for Innovative Planners

Posted By Dana Saal, CMP, CAE, Saal Meeting Consulting, Friday, April 28, 2017
Updated: Thursday, April 27, 2017

CONVINCING THEM IT’S A GOOD IDEA
The most difficult part of change can be convincing stakeholders that it’s needed. You’re working with people who see the meeting through their own filters, including long-held beliefs (beef for Thanksgiving, anyone?). This allows for healthy debate, but can be a stumbling block when consensus is the goal.

How can you manage the conversation without tearing out your hair?

Tip #1

Know your audience

  • Know your supporters and detractors.
  • Pre-wire key influencers.
  • Determine how your stakeholders best accept change—managing the scope (not all at once); demonstrating the new practices (see it in action); hearing it from an outside expert (they always know more than you, right?!); etc.

Tip #2

Prep them

  • Identify strategic goals in advance so everyone starts on the same page. The goals are not part of the discussion, they are the basis for it. Support this by listing them on your agenda.
  • Provide examples of:
    • successful use elsewhere
    • measurable benefits
    • potential outcomes if change is not accepted
    • additional material needed to support objections you’re likely to face

Tip #3

Allow for time acceptance

  • Build in time to ponder the proposals. Don’t expect full acceptance at the first meeting.
  • Get feedback, asking for their likes, concerns and suggestions.
  • Consider a phased-in approach by introducing changes over several years instead of all at once.

One Awesome Idea
Make them feel the change, not just think about it
Your stakeholders’ responses are loaded with emotion. To sort that out, assign each stakeholder a role that represents one participant perspective (e.g., young professional, seasoned exhibitor, one discipline, etc.). Coach them to put themselves in that person’s shoes as you verbally walk through your meeting, asking them to think about how they feel as they “attend” the meeting.

You need to be a great storyteller. Stay neutral by focusing on the outcomes. They need to shed pre-conceived notions and to stay in their assigned personas.

When you get to “happily ever after”, discuss their reactions to determine if you’ve built consensus, need to tweak some things, or try a new approach.

Want More?
There are many resources about persuading stakeholders. Check out a few based on the Google search “how to persuade stakeholders.”

Source Credit:
Aimee Gabel, Solar Energy Trade Shows, LLC and David Saef, GES MarketWorks, who presented the awesome session, Win Stakeholder Support for Cutting-Edge Programming at PCMA’s 2016 Convening Leaders.

Dana’s Meeting Minutes is based on the Meeting Planning Triangle©. Click here for a link.

Tags:  association  events  isae  Leadership  marketing  meeting planners  meeting tips  meetings  social media 

Share |
Permalink
 

Dana's Meeting Minutes: Three Tips and One Awesome Idea for Innovative Planners

Posted By Dana Saal, CMP, CAE, Saal Meeting Consulting, Friday, March 3, 2017
Updated: Tuesday, February 21, 2017

                        Three Tips and One Awesome Idea for Innovative Planners

 

TARGET AUDIENCE

Is your meeting audience as diverse as it could be? Have you really thought about who your meeting is designed for and whether you are reaching all potential registrants?

Thinking about this could increase your attendance (and income!) and enhance the level of expertise by broadening your list of participants.

Tip #1

List types of people/positions affiliated with your industry. For example, if you’re planning the Annual Convention of Dark Green Architects, your target audience is Dark Green Architects, but could also include:

·         their co-workers in other departments, e.g. light green architects, designers

·         professionals from affiliate industries, e.g. engineers, mortar specialists

·         academics and students from universities

Tip #2

Your association leadership is one of your target audiences.

You are primarily planning for Dark Green Architects, but your board and committee members may want/need a say in your meeting design, making them a target audience.

Tip #3

Plan only for your target audience.

Don’t toss in a session for non-target audiences in the hopes more people will show up. Be clear who you’re planning for and then plan well for them. That will increase attendance.

One Awesome Idea

Ask members what types of people help make them successful and then pursue them as future participants.

Ask them one or all of these questions:

1.      What types of people do you partner with in your job?

2.      What types of people would you like to connect with at the meeting?

3.      What is one type of person not with your same expertise who has influenced how you do your job?

Want More?

Check out this blog by Jeff Hurt of Velvet Chainsaw. He uses exhibitor satisfaction as the basis for target audience identification, but the concept supports all aspects of meeting planning. http://velvetchainsaw.com/2012/11/09/identifying-segmenting-conference-target-audience/

DMM|1703|03-03-17

Dana L. Saal, CMP, CAE, has been planning meetings for associations for more than 30 years. She recently decided that coaching meeting planners is now more fun than proofing BEOs, counting coffee cups and writing scripts. If you think a bit of coaching could improve your meeting, send a message via her website! (www.saalmeetings.com)

Tags:  events  meeting planners  meeting tips 

Share |
PermalinkComments (0)
 

Dana's Meeting Minutes: Three Tips and One Awesome Idea for Innovative Planners

Posted By Dana Saal, CMP, CAE, Saal Meeting Consulting, Friday, February 17, 2017
Updated: Monday, January 30, 2017

 

Three Tips and One Awesome Idea for Innovative Planners

OBJECTIVES

Meeting success requires writing, not just thinking about, why you’re planning your meeting. These, of course, are your objectives and they serve two purposes to:

1. Tell you what to plan.

2. Tell you what not to plan.

Number 2 might be surprising, but objectives provide you with a great way to keep you (and those over-zealous volunteers!) from straying into the Meeting Planning Vortex. (see my definition; click here)

Tip #1

Write objectives that address stakeholders, the association and the industry.

Consider all the reasons you’re planning your meeting from making $xx (be specific) to creating a place where industry professionals can laugh together. Yes, that can be an objective if that is really your goal. Consider how your meeting benefits the industry and various stakeholders to help focus your thoughts. Also consider how your budget might influence your objectives.

Tip #2

Write objectives for every meeting, even the oldies, but goodies.

Writing objectives for a repeat meeting, the 132nd Annual, for example, might seem unnecessary. You’re having the meeting because the association has had one for the past 131 years for heaven’s sake! That meeting needs written objectives just as much as a new meeting does.

Tip #3

Just say NO to projects, tasks and other distractions that do not fulfill the objectives.

When someone wants you to “just do one more ______ (fill in the blank),” blame those objectives, just say NO and remind them why you must stick with fulfilling objectives.

One Awesome Idea

Do it yourself to get it done quickly.

Instead of asking your planning committee to write the objectives, you write at least three and ask them to fine-tune them. You probably know them better than they do anyway and it will save you lots of time.

Want More?

To learn exactly how to write objectives, check out a blog by Courtney Muehlmeier of TEAMINGS Successful Meetings. (http://teamings.com/blog/how-to-sharpen-your-meeting-objective/)

DMM|1702|02-17-17

 

Dana L. Saal, CMP, CAE, has been planning meetings for associations for more than 30 years. She recently decided that coaching meeting planners is now more fun than proofing BEOs, counting coffee cups and writing scripts. If you think a bit of coaching could improve your meeting, send a message via her website! (www.saalmeetings.com)

Tags:  meeting planners  meeting tips  meetings 

Share |
PermalinkComments (0)
 
ISAE Community Search